ADHD and Tax Preparation

I don’t know anyone who loves to get their information ready for tax time. This task can be even harder for adults with ADHD – because of the organization that is needed, as well as the need to keep track of all of the information needed over a whole year.

Margarita Tartakovsky wrote a great article on Psychcentral called: Tax Prep for People with ADHD for Next Year. You can read the full article at that link.

The three main points of the article:

  1. Figure out what information you should be saving
  2. Have a way to record tax deductible expenses
  3. Create one place for tax related paperwork
  4. Schedule tax time each week.

With some work early in the year, and a small amount of time throughout the year, you can improve your tax prep significantly. This can help you to file on time, save on late fees, or get a refund much more quickly. It can also lower your stress.

Do you have any tricks or strategies that work well? Please share them in the comments below.

Best,

Dr. Kenny

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Comments

  1. 18 years old, boarding school graduate. Haven’t had a job yet or my own place yet because of school. Thus I haven’t had to ever file taxes yet. I have been thinking about the issue of taxes and organization and it’s been worrying me to death….I’m gonna go read that article now.

  2. Taxes are my nightmare. I have a business and rental properties and it’s literally painful to for me to keep track of paperwork. I use to have my books on Quicken, which I highly recommend, but my husband, also ADHD, took over the books and trashed them. I have yet to reconstruct a working system. I heartily recommend obtaining outside help for finance related things and I’ll be seeking out someone to help me. Humility is good for the soul.

    I’d like to make the point that “knowing what to do” doesn’t always solve the problem and can, ironically, just be salt in the wound. Simply getting started and maintaining consistency and regularity are the big issues for me. I have good habits in a number of areas of my life but taxes remain a no-mans land to date.

    Dr. Russell Barkley speaks to the problem that ADHD’ers have with applying “good advise”. Please see the video link below found on my blog.

    http://faithartfarming.blogspot.com/2011/05/different-child.html

    (By the way, there are actually 4 points listed rather than 3 in your article…)

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